Project Management and Advanced Research

The student blog for Cardiff University Module SET265

The Projects

The Project Management and Research module enables students to participate in and contribute to a number of research projects running at Cardiff’s Centre for Editorial and Intertextual Research. The current schedule includes the following:

  • Database of Mid-Victorian Illustration: an online database of nearly 1000 literary images from the nineteenth century. Attached activities might include: curating a selection of images based on a theme at a suitable venue or online; digitising and preparing a set of related images using suitable software for future uploading to the database; preparing metadata to be attached to the digitised images; undertaking research on the images and the texts to which they relate; preparing an online exhibition about a particular theme or strand to be mounted on the database website.
  • Illustration Archive: The Illustration Archive was created between 2014 and 2015, as part of the ‘Lost Visions’ project, funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council, and was the result of collaboration between humanities specialists and computer scientists at Cardiff University. The Illustration Archive makes available and fully searchable over a million illustrations from works of literature, philosophy, history and geography that are in the British Library’s collection and were scanned by Microsoft. Activities might involve identifiying provenance of items; checking bibliographical data; tagging images; curating an exhibition based on a series of images; along with other activities listed for DMVI above.
  • World of Illustration/The Illustrated World: a new project that seeks to map topographical illustrations from the Illustration Archive to real-world locations, which will be commencing in Spring 2017. Attached activities might include: compiling a listing of illustrations from the entire corpus of titles as a preliminary exercise; locating images from a particular work or set of works; researching name changes of locations; preparing a series of short essays to be published online about the relationships between the illustrations and locations.
  • British Fiction, 1800–1829: A Database of Production, Circulation & Reception: a database of over 2250 novels published in the second half of the Romantic period. Attached activities might include: researching further information about authors and texts listed in the database; consulting related archives based in Cardiff to enhance the information held on the database; providing plot summaries of the novels listed in the database and held in Cardiff; tracing reviews of the novels listed in the database from other electronic and printed resources.
  • New Edinburgh Edition of the Works of Robert Louis Stevenson: a project to prepare a full edition of the Stevenson’s writings in 39 volumes between 2012 and 2020. Attached activities might include: digitising source materials and converting them to electronic text; proofreading existing electronic texts that have already been converted; undertaking research for annotations on particular items or sections of text; preparing edited texts in anticipation of publication.
  • University of Wales Press Scholarly Editions: a new imprint, commencing in 2017, which will produce a range of new scholarly editions prepared in CEIR. The series will initially focus on three strands: Gothic Originals; Women’s Writing; Romantic and Victorian Literature. Attached activities might include: digitising source materials and converting them to electronic text; proofreading existing electronic texts that have already been converted; undertaking research for annotations on particular items or sections of text; preparing edited texts in anticipation of publication.
  • Romantic Textualities: Literature and Print Culture, 1780–1840: an online journal running since 1997 published on a regular basis from within CEIR, and edited by Anthony Mandal. Attached activities might include: liaising with contributors about their submissions; securing readers for articles submitted to the journal for consideration; coordinating with reviewers for books received; proofreading submissions; preparing abstracts for archived essays; adding tags to untagged items; assisting in the preparation of the final text.
  • Journal of Literature and Science: an online journal running since 2008, focused on the intersections beteen science and literature, edited by Martin Willis within ENCAP. Attached activities might include: liaising with contributors about their submissions; securing readers for articles submitted to the journal for consideration; coordinating with reviewers for books received; proofreading submissions; preparing abstracts for archived essays; adding tags to untagged items; assisting in the preparation of the final text.
  • Cardiff University Special Collections: opportunities might be available for a limited number of students on the module to work within the University’s Special Collections, possibly the recently acquired Cardiff Rare Books or the Salisbury Collection. Attached activities might include: assisting in the cataloguing of books; examining and describing books in the collection; curating a digital exhibition relating to the collections in SCOLAR; researching the texts, authors and publishers of parts of the collection.
  • Cardiff Book History blog: a blog that provides updates about the various research projects based in CEIR, as well as more general information regarding matters of related interest. Attached activities might include: researching and writing original blog entries; preparing items submitted by other contributors for mounting on the blog; sourcing new topics of interest for the blog by external contributors; conducting interviews to be included in the blog.
  • Cardiff Digital Cultures Network blog: Formed in December 2015, and funded by Cardiff University’s College of Arts, Humanities and Social Science, the Network is an interdisciplinary grouping that aims to bring together researchers, creative practitioners and library/museum professionals involved with digital work to share expertise and best practice. The Network runs a series of events focused on a range of themes ranging from word/image relations, through archives and the creative economy, to Big Data, a fortnightly reading group and an online blog. Activities might include researching and writing original blog entries on digital culture; sourcing new topics of interest for the blog by external contributors; more general research on digital cultures and developments in digital humanities (e.g. on the ‘future’ of the book; on copyright and the internet; on the use of digital archives); conducting interviews to be included in the blog; creative/critical mashups and remixes.
  • The Palgrave History of Gothic Publishing: The Business of Gothic Fiction, 1764–1835: Anthony Mandal is currently co-authoring an encyclopaedia of authors, publishers, printers and circulating libraries from the first wave of gothic fiction. The book will run to 230,000 words, and will be the first of its sort, including overview essays, entries of varying lengths, illustrations and maps. Attached activities might include collating and compiling core data about figures or institutions to be featured in entries; drawing up lists of addresses for businesses included in the Guide; locating and marking out these institutions on maps; researching authors’ biographical details in various archival and secondary resources; locating relevant images for entries.
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